CSR

The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, on the 15 July 2019 delivered a major speech on the causes of crime, which comes as City Hall publishes analysis confirming a strong link between serious youth violence and Londoners affected by deprivation, poor mental health and poverty.

The new figures show that three-quarters of the boroughs in London with the highest levels of violent offending are also in the top 10 most deprived, while the same boroughs also have higher proportions of children under 20 living in poverty than the London average.

The statistics, in the most detailed study of the causes of violent crime ever undertaken in London, show that more than a quarter of all young Londoners live in the most deprived areas of the capital. It also reveals that serious youth violence in the capital started rising in 2012.

The link between poverty and crime
Every law enforcement leader knows from years of experience that children immersed in poverty are more likely to turn to crime. Research also consistently confirms that. For example, in a large study conducted by Cambridge University, boys from the poorest quarter of all families were two and a half times more likely to be convicted of a violent crime as adults than boys from the wealthier three quarters of all families in the study.

A new study shows that children growing up in poverty are seven times more likely to harm themselves and be involved in violent crimes as young adults. This research highlights the importance of providing child-friendly public services, housing, education and mentorship.

Rising child poverty in Britain is a serious problem, made more serious by the failure to understand why those numbers are growing and to focus on the right solutions to it.

People from minority ethnic groups are, on average, much more likely to be in income poverty than white British people, the differences being greatest for children and least for pensioners. Almost half of all children from minority ethnic groups are in poverty. 

For all family types, people from minority ethnic groups are, on average, more likely to be in income poverty than white British people, the differences being greatest for couples with children and least for lone parents. 

For all family work statuses, people from minority ethnic groups are, on average, more likely to be in income poverty than white British people, the differences being greatest for ‘working families’ (families where at least one adult is in paid work) and least for ‘workless families’ (families where no adult is in paid work)

In the UK today, too many young people grow up without a positive role model in their lives.

Without these role models, young people do not have anyone to turn to for advice and guidance for the future. In a world where we teach young people to dream big, as a society we often fail in helping them to turn these dreams into reality.
This is why in 2021, at GoodLife Enterprises we launched our Mentoring Programme. The programme is set to support young people by creating jobs for 16-24-year olds who are at risk of long-term unemployment, supporting them to raise their aspirations and learn key skills which will support them in their future career.

In 2022 we want to offer opportunities to more young people from BAME groups in more regions across the UK. Our aim is to support young people. We at GoodLife enterprises believe that young people have the power to change the world. But young people cannot change it alone. They will need guidance, they will need support, and many of them will need mentors.

Join us today as we work together to uplift the next generation of young people.